‘JesusChrist Evilina Lucifer-Obama’ sanguine after name change trouble

She’s had a devil of a time changing her name.

A Staten Islander who lost out on a bid to legally change her name to “JesusChrist Evilina Lucifer-Obama,” was actually going for a much longer moniker, she told The Post.

Nancy Evelina Torres-Amos, a mom of five, actually wanted to be rechristened as “Imperial Highness Archduchess Goddess JesusChrist Evilina Lucifer-Obama,” she said in an interview.

Torres-Amos, 43, went to Richmond County Civil Court last month in her quest for the new name, but says court personnel asked her to shorten the eight-word request because it was too long.

“They told me to fix it and shorten it up,” she said.

So instead, she simplified her application to JesusChrist Evilina Lucifer-Obama, citing “personal preference” in court paperwork as her reason for wanting the sobriquet.

Nancy Evelina Torres-Amos had her name change rejected in court.
J.C. Rice for NY Post

Despite her flexibility, Judge Matthew Blum shot down Torres-Amos’ name change application, a decision first reported by Law.com.

The new name would cause “public alarm and undue stress,” Blum wrote in his Nov. 3 rejection.

“By assuming the name ‘JesusChrist’, is one expected to praise you? On the other hand by assuming the name ‘Lucifer’, is one expected to avoid or reject you? Are you claiming to be the Son of God or Prince of Darkness? Are you forcing a non-believer in either of these entities to accept the existence of these entities?” Blum mused in court papers.

Torres-Amos' initial request was too long.
Torres-Amos’ initial request was too long.

Torres-Amos' application.
Torres-Amos’ application.

Torres-Amos was raised in foster care.
Torres-Amos, who said she grew up in foster care and said her children are currently in foster care, was not angry about being spurned.

“Allowing this name change would place unwitting members of the public in the position of having to proclaim [Torres-Amos’] religious beliefs, which may or may not be in agreement with that person’s own beliefs.”

Torres-Amos, who said she grew up in foster care and said her children are currently in foster care, was not angry about being spurned.

“It was enough for them to understand that I know who I am,” she said.