Connect with us

General News

Trish Regan Out at Fox Business After Referring to Coronavirus as ‘Impeachment Scam’

Tori Holland

Published

on

Trish Regan Out at Fox Business After Referring to Coronavirus as ‘Impeachment Scam’

Fox Business Network has severed ties with primetime host Trish Regan, who sparked controversy after claiming that the ongoing coronavirus pandemic was an “impeachment scam” around two weeks ago.

“Fox Business has parted ways with Trish Regan,” the network said in a statement. “We thank her for her contributions to the network over the years and wish her continued success in her future endeavors. We will continue our reduced live primetime schedule for the foreseeable future in an effort to allocate staff resources to continuous breaking news coverage on the coronavirus crisis.”

The network’s decision stemmed from an early March segment on “Trish Regan Primetime,” the television host’s now-defunct show, where Regan told a multitude of lies about the virus. Regan alleged that Democrats were singularly blaming President Donald Trump for the virus and that Democrats and left-wingers had a “need to create mass hysteria to encourage a market selloff” and “stop the economy,” all while a large graphic titled “CORONAVIRUS IMPEACHMENT SCAM” was displayed onscreen.

Regan announced that her show had been placed on hiatus on March 13, the day she hosted her final show. Regan is one of several Fox personalities and guests who have recently lied and downplayed the dangers of the coronavirus pandemic.

Fox Business Network has severed ties with primetime host Trish Regan, who sparked controversy after claiming that the ongoing coronavirus pandemic was an “impeachment scam” around two weeks ago.

“Fox Business has parted ways with Trish Regan,” the network said in a statement. “We thank her for her contributions to the network over the years and wish her continued success in her future endeavors. We will continue our reduced live primetime schedule for the foreseeable future in an effort to allocate staff resources to continuous breaking news coverage on the coronavirus crisis.”

The network’s decision stemmed from an early March segment on “Trish Regan Primetime,” the television host’s now-defunct show, where Regan told a multitude of lies about the virus. Regan alleged that Democrats were singularly blaming President Donald Trump for the virus and that Democrats and left-wingers had a “need to create mass hysteria to encourage a market selloff” and “stop the economy,” all while a large graphic titled “CORONAVIRUS IMPEACHMENT SCAM” was displayed onscreen.

Regan announced that her show had been placed on hiatus on March 13, the day she hosted her final show. Regan is one of several Fox personalities and guests who have recently lied and downplayed the dangers of the coronavirus pandemic.

Fox News host Jeanine Pirro downplayed the virus’ deadliness in early March, while network host Laura Ingraham, who previously taunted school shooting survivor David Hogg, then 17, for getting rejected from colleges, promoted unproven drugs in response to the pandemic. Sean Hannity previously referred to the coronavirus as a “hoax.” Conservative personality and university heir Jerry Falwell Jr. recently promoted a conspiracy theory on Fox and Friends that the coronavirus was co-created by North Korea and China to assault the United States and, like Regan, suggested that media coverage of the pandemic was politically motivated.

Though Regan’s comments about the coronavirus generated particularly strong pushback, they weren’t the first time that the television host had generated controversy. Regan’s prior segments included accusations that Christine Blasey Ford’s sexual assault claims against Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh were politically motivated and a suggestion that Ilhan Omar (D-Minnesota) — a favorite target for racist attacks by Trump and other prominent conservatives — was antisemitic.

Regan, who joined Fox in 2015, also aired a variety of interviews with conspiracy theorist Jerome Corsi, who has actively promoted the birther conspiracies about President Barack Obama’s citizenship, during her time at the network.

“I have enjoyed my time at FOX and now intend to focus on my family during these troubled times,” Regan said in a statement provided by the network. “I am grateful to my incredible team at FOX Business and for the many opportunities the network has provided me. I’m looking forward to this next chapter in my career.”

After being a professional journalist for 5 years and understanding the ups and downs of health care sector all over the world, Tori shifted her focus to the digital world. Today, she works as a contributor for News Brig with a knack for covering general and health news in the best possible format.

Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

General News

Police try to stop Floyd rally in Sydney due to virus fears

Tori Holland

Published

on

South Korean protesters shout slogans during a protest over the death of George Floyd, a black man who died after being restrained by Minneapolis police officers on May 25, near the U.S. embassy in Seoul, South Korea, Friday, June 5, 2020. The signs read "The U.S. government should stop oppression and there is no peace without justice." (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon)

SYDNEY (AP) — Police challenged whether a Black Lives Matter protest planned for Saturday in Australia’s largest city is too much of a virus risk, as demonstrators in the capital reminded the country that racial inequality is not a U.S. issue alone.

In Canberra, organizers of a rally Friday that attracted about 2,000 demonstrators handed out masks and hand sanitizer. Most protesters kept a recommended social distance but drew closer to hear speeches. Public gatherings are limited to 20 in Canberra, but police did not intervene.

School teacher Wendy Brookman, a member of the Butchulla indigenous people, said Australia should not accept more than 430 indigenous Australians dying in police custody or prison in the past three decades.

“We’re not here to jump on the bandwagon of what’s happened in the United States,” Brookman said. “We’re here to voice what’s happening to our indigenous people.”

One of the protesters’ signs “I can’t breathe,” drew a parallel between George Floyd’s death in the U.S. on May 25 and the Australian indigenous experience. Those words were among the last spoken by Floyd and an indigenous Australian, David Dungay, who died in a prison hospital in 2015 while being restrained by five guards.

In South Korea, dozens gathered in front of the U.S. Embassy to condemn what they described as police brutality toward protesters in the U.S. They called for South Korea’s government to speak against the “racial discrimination and state violence” of its ally and pushed for an anti-discrimination law to improve the lives of migrant workers, undocumented foreigners and other minorities.

“As the U.S. civil society empowered and stood in solidarity with Korean pro-democracy activists in the past, we will now stand in solidarity with citizens in the United States,” said activist Lee Sang-hyun, referring to South Koreans’ bloody struggles against military dictatorships that ruled the country until the late 1980s.

Holding a banner that read “Justice for Floyd,” most of the protesters wore black and some brought flowers in honor of Floyd, who died last month after a white Minneapolis police officer pressed his neck with a knee for several minutes while he pleaded for air.

Larger marches are planned in Seoul on Saturday to protest Floyd’s death.

In Australia, police in New South Wales state asked the Supreme Court to declare the Sydney protest illegal. Prime Minister Scott Morrison is among those who criticized the plans, saying of the protesters: “I say to them, don’t go.”

State Premier Gladys Berejiklian said organizers proposed a protest far smaller than what is likely to now take place Saturday. She said protesters could not guarantee social distancing protocols would be followed.

“All of us have given up so much and worked so hard to make sure we get on top of the virus,” Berejiklian told reporters.

In Sydney, outdoor gatherings are restricted to 10 people, while up to 50 people can go to funerals, places of worship, restaurants, pubs and cafes. New South Wales and Victoria, where another large protest is planned in Melbourne, are Australia’s worst-hit states by the virus.

Continue Reading

General News

Navy carrier sidelined by coronavirus back operating in Pacific

Evan Lewis

Published

on

Navy carrier sidelined by coronavirus back operating in Pacific

Ten long weeks after a massive coronavirus outbreak sidelined one of the Navy’s signature warships, the U.S.S. Theodore Roosevelt has returned to sea and is conducting military operations in the Pacific region.

Lining the flight deck in their dress white uniforms, sailors wearing white face masks stood a virus-safe 10-feet apart in a final, formal thank you as the ship sailed out of port in Guam Thursday and headed into the Philippine Sea.

“We manned the rail, which we don’t normally do. There was a lot of symbolism in that,” Navy Capt. Carlos Sardiello told The Associated Press in an interview from the ship Thursday. “They’re excited. They’re fired up to be back at sea doing the mission.”

The Roosevelt pulled into Guam March 27, with a rapidly escalating number of sailors testing positive for the virus. Over time, more than 1,000 were infected with COVID-19, setting off a lengthy and systematic process to move about 4,000 sailors ashore for quarantine and treatment, while about 800 remained aboard to protect and run the high-tech systems, including the nuclear reactors that run the vessel.

Slowly, sailors were methodically brought back on board, while the others who had remained went ashore for their mandated two-week quarantine. And in late March, the ship with only about 3,000 crew aboard went out to sea for roughly two weeks of training, including the recertification of the flight deck and fighter squadron, such as takeoffs and landings on the carrier.

Earlier this week, the Roosevelt wrapped up training and returned to Guam to pick up nearly 1,000 sailors who had been left there to either complete their quarantine or to manage and work with those still on the island. As the ship sailed into the port, it was flying a flag with the words “Don’t Give Up the Ship,” a famous Navy battle cry from the War of 1812.

“Our sailors didn’t give up the ship. They fought and got it back. So I thought it was appropriate,” said Sardiello, who asked one of the other Navy ships to borrow their flag. “The ship was clean and the ship was healthy with no COVID cases. So I said, ok, we’re going to fly that one time on the way into Guam as a symbol to bolster their morale.”

RS1 Katie VanDrimmelen was one of the sailors left ashore during the two week training. She had tested positive for the virus and was in quarantine for about five weeks. Walking back onto the ship, she said, was like being welcomed home from a deployment.

“It was amazing,” said VanDrimmelen, of Ogden, Utah. “It was very comforting to be back in our normal atmosphere. Everybody was happy.”

Sardiello said that watching the sailors board the ship was a great feeling, But he knows he’s not done yet. There are still about 350 sailors on Guam who are either in isolation or are there as support staff.

“More and more of those sailors are meeting the return-to-work criteria, and we’re flying them on board every single day. So we’re whittling down that number day by day,” said Sardiello. “But I really want those 350 remaining back. And we’re working hard on that.”

He said that any sailors who don’t recover in time will be transported back to the U.S. The ship is expected to continue operations in the Pacific, and then would likely head home to San Diego later this summer.

The Roosevelt has been at the center of a still unresolved controversy that led to the firing of the ship’s previous captain, the resignation of the Navy secretary and an expanded investigation into what triggered the outbreak and how well top naval commanders handled it.

Sardiello, had previously captained the Roosevelt, but was abruptly sent back to the ship in early April to take command after Capt. Brett Crozier was fired for urging his commanders to take faster action to stem the virus outbreak onboard.

After a preliminary review last month, Adm. Mike Gilday, the Navy’s top officer, recommended that Crozier be reinstated as ship captain. But the Navy decided to conduct a broader investigation.

That review, which effectively delays a decision on Crozier’s reinstatement, was finished and submitted to Gilday at the end of March and he is still reviewing the extensive report, which includes several hundred pages of interviews, documents and recommendations.

Cmdr. Nate Christensen, spokesman for Gilday, said it will take time for the admiral to finish his review and make any decisions.

Continue Reading

General News

Czechs drop travel curbs for Austria, Germany, Hungary from noon on Friday

Evan Lewis

Published

on

Czechs drop travel curbs for Austria, Germany, Hungary from noon on Friday

PRAGUE (Reuters) – The Czech government agreed to fully open its borders with neighbours Austria and Germany and also allow unrestricted travel with Hungary from noon on Friday, Prime Minister Andrej Babis said on Twitter.

The decision follows Thursday’s full opening of the border with Slovakia.

Reporting by Jan Lopatka; Editing by Clarence Fernandez

Continue Reading

Trending