Connect with us

General News

Video shows couple having sex in Brooklyn subway station

Tori Holland

Published

on

Video shows couple having sex in Brooklyn subway station

The MTA is gonna need more of those disinfecting UV lamps …

A raunchy couple took advantage of the practically empty transit system to get freaky on a subway platform, a new video shows.

The nearly minute-long clip, filmed by a chuckling onlooker from across the tracks, appears to show a man and woman in the throes of passion on the platform of the Flushing Avenue station in Brooklyn.

“Yeah, I don’t care, I don’t mind that s–t, that s–t is like PornHub to me,” the giddy gawker can be heard saying as the man looks over, sticks out his tongue and flashes hand-horns.

“This is New York City, you see everything, you hear! Oh, he came. He f–king came. I can’t even concentrate with s–t like this.”

“Have a good one, bro,” the voyeur, who sources say was a construction worker from nearby street work, shouts before walking away while laughing.

It was unclear when the video was shot.

In a bid to stop the spread of coronavirus, the MTA has contracted more cleaners, rolled out virus-killing ultraviolet lamps and even taken the unheard-of step of suspending service overnight to disinfect trains.

Asked about the lewd public display of affection, the MTA took pride in the cleanliness of its stations — but still discouraged people from getting down on the underground.

“We are proud the subways are as clean as they’ve ever been, but no need to try them out like these geniuses,” MTA spokesman Tim Minton said.

“Glad we announced our ultraviolet disinfecting pilot yesterday because we are going to need it on this platform.”

After being a professional journalist for 5 years and understanding the ups and downs of health care sector all over the world, Tori shifted her focus to the digital world. Today, she works as a contributor for News Brig with a knack for covering general and health news in the best possible format.

Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

General News

Russia reports 8,984 new coronavirus cases, 134 deaths in last 24 hours

Evan Lewis

Published

on

Russia reports 8,984 new coronavirus cases, 134 deaths in last 24 hours

People walk and ride bicycles along an embankment of the Moskva River on a warm summer day, after local authorities partially lifted quarantine restrictions imposed to prevent the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Moscow, Russia June 6, 2020. Kirill Zykov/Moscow News Agency/Handout via REUTERS

MOSCOW (Reuters) – Russia reported 8,984 new cases of the novel coronavirus in the last 24 hours on Sunday, pushing the total number of infections to 467,673.

Officials said 134 people had died during the same period, bringing the official nationwide death toll to 5,859.

Reporting by Gleb Stolyarov; Writing by Maxim Rodionov; Editing by Raissa Kasolowsky

Continue Reading

General News

Protesters topple Confederate statue in Virginia capital

Tori Holland

Published

on

Protesters topple Confederate statue in Virginia capital

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — A small group of demonstrators toppled a statue of a Confederate general in the the former capital of the Confederacy late Saturday, following a day of largely peaceful protests in the Virginia city.

The statue of Gen. Williams Carter Wickham was pulled from its pedestal in Monroe Park, a Richmond police spokeswoman said. She said she did not know if there were any arrests or damage done to the statue.

A rope had been tied around the Confederate statue, which has stood since 1891, The Richmond Times-Dispatch reported, adding that someone urinated on the statue after it was pulled down. Photos and video from the newspaper showed the what appeared to be red paint splashed or sprayed on the statue.

In 2017, some of Wickham’s descendants urged the city to remove the statue.

Confederate monuments are a major flashpoint in Virginia and elsewhere in the South. Confederate memorials began coming down after a white supremacist killed nine black people at a Bible study in a church in South Carolina in 2015 and then again after the deadly white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, in 2017.

Last week, Gov. Ralph Northam announced that a state-owned statue of former Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee would be removed from its perch on the famed Monument Avenue “as soon as possible.”

The Lee statue is one of five Confederate monuments along Monument Avenue, a prestigious residential street and National Historic Landmark district. Monuments along the avenue have been rallying points during protests in recent days over Floyd’s death, and they have been tagged with graffiti, including messages that say “End police brutality” and “Stop white supremacy.”

Richmond Mayor Levar Stoney last week announced plans to seek the removal of the other Confederate monuments along Monument Avenue, which include statues of Confederate President Jefferson Davis and Confederate Gens. Stonewall Jackson and J.E.B. Stuart. Those statues sit on city land, unlike the Lee statue, which is on state property.

Stoney said he would introduce an ordinance July 1 to have the statues removed. That’s when a new law goes into effect, which was signed earlier this year by Northam, that undoes an existing state law protecting Confederate monuments and instead lets local governments decide their fate.

Wickham’s statue stood in Monroe Park, about a mile away from the Lee statue and surrounded by the Virginia Commonwealth University campus.

Continue Reading

General News

Shop owners reveal the financial and emotional struggles of being looted

Evan Lewis

Published

on

Shop owners reveal the financial and emotional struggles of being looted

After this week’s looting and ransacking in Manhattan and The Bronx, Lucy Hosley went viral. The 69-year-old co-owner of the Valentine Deli was seen on a video posted to YouTube, imploring: “They tell me ‘Black Lives Matter.’ They’re lying . . . I’m black, look what you did to my store.”

Hosley told The Post’s Jane Ridley that she witnessed “around 30 young men and women overturning the shelves and causing chaos . . . They had bought cutting tools to break open the ATM and the cash register. At first I felt anger toward the looters. But I can’t let hate consume me. Many of them have been brought up in a society which believes they are worth nothing and they are acting on that. We will rebuild this store and it will serve this community again.” A GoFundMe for her store had, by Friday, raised more than $114,600.

Inspired by her, other vandalized shop owners spoke out.

‘By looting my store, you’re sending a message that I don’t deserve what I have. But I’m a minority, too’

Oscar Izaguirre, 25, owns Oscar’s Gold & Diamonds on Grand Concourse in the Fordham section of The Bronx. He watched as his store was ransacked during Monday’s violence.

My parents moved from Peru to live the American dream, and opened a pawn shop in 1986 to put me and my three siblings through college. I took it over and rebranded it as a jewelry store five years ago. My father was a trained jewelry repairman who taught me the business when I was a kid. I’ve been helping out since I was 8 — the store has been my whole life.

The quarantine hit me hard. I closed completely for almost two months. We were just getting back up on our feet with online sales.

Early Monday I got concerned calls from friends about rioters descending on our little stretch: “They’re going to The Bronx, so get your s–t out now.” I was terrified. There’s millions of dollars of merchandise. Along with 15 or so friends, I moved everything to a safe location.

I was at home that night when, around 8:30, I watched on my security camera as a group of men wielding sledgehammers lifted the gate off its track, popped the lock and got into the store. By the time I got there, there were gunshots and fires on the street. Some people had weapons: crowbars, bricks. I was afraid they’d burn up my store, but I stood 20 feet away and said nothing. I was afraid for my life. For several hours, I watched looters go into my store and break the cameras, bash the glass cases, destroy the wiring, even knock out the ceiling tiles. Every store around me got trashed, and I did not hear one rant for justice or for ­George Floyd. Not in The Bronx, not that night. That night, they targeted minorities. They were opportunists who just wanted to steal.

By looting my store, you’re sending a message that I don’t deserve what I have. But I’m a minority, too. My family and I have worked our whole lives for this.

— As told to Doree Lewak


‘Locals told me they called 911 about my shop, but no one responded’

Mario Badali, 30, owner of Village Square Pizza in the East Village, came to work Tuesday to find his shop’s front door shattered and the soda case raided.

I saw a lot of activity going on in Soho and the Midtown, Times Square area on the weekend, but the East Village was pretty quiet the first two nights after the protests. So I wasn’t really expecting anything.

But I took prec autions. I have iPads that are hanging up here and we started to hide them at night.

Still, never in a million years did I think this was going to happen.

I feel violated. People in the neighborhood consider me a friend.

Locals told me they tried calling 911 but no one was responding.

We’ve been doing delivery and takeout during the pandemic, but business was taking a hit and this ain’t doing any better to us.

My front door is a custom glass door. ­Replacing that is going to run me an easy $10,000. The stolen sodas cost another $200.

I support the cause. What happened to ­George Floyd is 1,000 percent wrong. But I don’t agree with vandalizing businesses.

Since the attack, we’ve been boarding the shop up and closing early for the curfew. But we’re staying open in the day. I’m not going to let nobody stop me.

— As told to Marisa Dellatto


‘I don’t know if we can survive’

Abdul Shamim, an immigrant from Bangladesh, arrived at his SK Global Trading Monday to find the front of his Nomad shop damaged. Now the 56-year-old from Queens may call it quits.

All the stores in the area, ­everything is broken. My window, they just hit. They could not break it. But we had to spend a lot of money to make sure it would be safe — $2,700 for locks. I’ve had this business over 10 years, but now we are in a panic situation. I don’t know if we can survive. We are a wholesaler, all of the customers are from overseas. There are no flights. People are not coming. How am I going to pay rent?
— As told to Melissa Klein


‘Whatever was too damaged to sell, we donated’

On Monday, Rachel Krupa, owner of The Goods Mart on Lafayette Street, found her convenience store vandalized. Then the 40-year-old saw Soho’s community strength.

I sobbed as I saw window after window on Lafayette broken, including my own. The door was damaged and the display shelf knocked over. Whoever did this took snack bars, candy, beverages. But my neighbors came to help. Someone cleaned up glass from the street, another person put up plywood. Artists painted a mural on the plywood. Two little girls who are regulars came in with a “We love The Goods Mart” sign. Whatever products were too damaged to sell, I donated to a shelter in Brooklyn. I am lucky. I have insurance. While we don’t have as much product, we reopened. But we need to remember why this happened, and ask how to change our society.

— As told to Kirsten Fleming

Continue Reading

Trending